August292014
worldofthecutestcuties:

I took my cat on his first walk yesterday

worldofthecutestcuties:

I took my cat on his first walk yesterday

(via analysethisinkblot)

August282014

Queer feminist bookstore needs help to transform into a nonprofit

bisexual-community:

Will you give a dollar (or more!) to help Wild Iris Books? They’ve already been behaving like a nonprofit for years, putting on feminist and LGBTQ+/trans-specific events and providing activist education. They are extremely bi and trans friendly. Some of their recent adventures include the Sinister Wisdom release party (Southern lesbian history), organizing the sign-making party for the protest in front of Gainesville’s new Hobby Lobby, and hosting trans activist Peter Cava’s talk about the new book Trans Bodies, Trans Selves, an event that concluded with a discussion between trans audience members about how they and their straight allies can work towards safer streets for trans pedestrians.

Here’s the link to their indiegogo campaign.

(via bisexual-books)

August272014
August242014

broken-endings:

funkylittleboatrace:

ok I can’t remember if I’ve mentioned this but I keep thinking about the story of Jack and the Beanstalk and how the best character in the whole story is only briefly mentioned. We’re given such limited amount of information about the guy that sells Jack the beans. essentially:

  • This guy has access to MAGIC BEANS
  • He either has NO USE for MAGIC BEANS or so many of them that he can just dispose of them
  • He really badly wants a cow

Why is the whole story not about this guy

i never realized this before

(via glenumbra)

8AM

shakethecobwebs:

if skinny people get this mad over one lyric in a song imagine how they would feel if they had to face the constant reminders that there is something fundamentally flawed and disgusting about your body and that it’s all your fault and that it would be better if you just didn’t exist (and this was evidenced, upheld and justified by popular culture, media, medical journals, clothing stores, family, friends, total strangers etc.)

y’all couldn’t do it. y’all wouldn’t last a day. 

(via stupidscalptattoos)

August232014
mainstreetbooks:

When Thomas Alva Edison asks for information, most feel compelled to give it. Not UW Professor Benjamin Bradshaw. Not when the question concerns a device conceived in anger and harnessed for murder. Bradshaw hopes that mysterious invention remains lost in Elliott Bay, eluding the search of deep-sea divers.
But when on a cold December morning an electrician is found dead in the Men’s Wear window of Seattle’s Bon Marché clutching a festoon of Edison’s holiday lights, Bradshaw suspects a dangerous game has been set in motion. Greed, passion, silence? Motives multiply as the dead man’s secrets come to light. Bradshaw and his investigative partner Henry Pratt join Seattle Police Detective O’Brien to narrow suspects, but Bradshaw’s intuition fails him. His heart is elsewhere, his attention distracted by the dilemma of loving a woman he cannot marry without defying his faith.
With Christmas fast approaching, the pressure mounts, as does Bradshaw’s dread that this will be his first unsolved case. With no other option, he does the unthinkable, and prepares to face his greatest fears. Whatever the outcome, there will be no going back.

mainstreetbooks:

When Thomas Alva Edison asks for information, most feel compelled to give it. Not UW Professor Benjamin Bradshaw. Not when the question concerns a device conceived in anger and harnessed for murder. Bradshaw hopes that mysterious invention remains lost in Elliott Bay, eluding the search of deep-sea divers.

But when on a cold December morning an electrician is found dead in the Men’s Wear window of Seattle’s Bon Marché clutching a festoon of Edison’s holiday lights, Bradshaw suspects a dangerous game has been set in motion. Greed, passion, silence? Motives multiply as the dead man’s secrets come to light. Bradshaw and his investigative partner Henry Pratt join Seattle Police Detective O’Brien to narrow suspects, but Bradshaw’s intuition fails him. His heart is elsewhere, his attention distracted by the dilemma of loving a woman he cannot marry without defying his faith.

With Christmas fast approaching, the pressure mounts, as does Bradshaw’s dread that this will be his first unsolved case. With no other option, he does the unthinkable, and prepares to face his greatest fears. Whatever the outcome, there will be no going back.

(Source: goodreads.com)

1PM

head-pirouette:

other people watching downton abbey:

image

me watching downton abbey:

image

(via flippyspoon)

August212014
chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.
It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.
Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.
Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.
We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.
People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.
In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

chiibinomonodamon:

mhd-hbd:

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.

It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.

Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.

Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.

We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.

People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

Japan is so densely packed with people, that if they had american attitudes a civil war would erupt.

I got lost in Tokyo and was able to rely on two guys on bikes to guide me back to my hotel.

In Harajuku, I complimented a lolita girl and asked her if there was a store nearby where I could buy clothes like that and she took me all the way down  the street to it!

(Source: sinnumero, via glenumbra)

August162014
1PM

How do you groom your fantastic eyebrows? (x)

(Source: elvenroyals, via the-hobbit)

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